First president of the Republic of Zambia, Kenneth Kaunda who died on June 17, 2021 of pneumonia has been mourned in a special memorial service in Zambia.

The incumbent president of Zambia, Edgar Lungu declared three weeks of official mourning for the late former president of the country.

Honouring one of Africa’s forefathers against apartheid in South Africa, the president of Zambia suspended all entertainment activities as part of the state’s last respect to the late Kenneth Kaunda. His body remains was then moved around the regions of Zambia for the citizens to pay tribute to the father of the land.

On Friday, July 02 2021, at the Lusaka show grounds, the government of Zambia held a memorial service graced by several heads of state and dignitaries for the late former president of Zambia.

Dr. Kaunda, Zambia’s founding father’s coffin was adorned with the flag of the country and was carried by the Zambian military at the memorial grounds.

The military bid the former commander in chief of the army a farewell with 21-gun salute at the memorial ceremony.

 

‘when an old man dies the villages loses its library’

Members present at the memorial were made to wave their white handkerchiefs in honour of the former president as a sign of victory in remembrance of the times he held white handkerchiefs, following his imprisonment at the time of struggle for freedom.

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States officials including president of the Republic of Ghana, Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo, South Africa’s President, Cyril Ramaphosa, African Union chairman Moussa Faki Mahamat among several others paid their last respect, recounting the legacy of the late father of the land of Zambia and the African continent.

His final funeral rites and burial service will be held on Wednesday, July 07 in a private ceremony with his family. He was 97 years old.

Kenneth Kaunda was born in April 1924 in Northern Rhodesia, present day Zambia a politician and a teacher. He completed his education in the year 1940 and took a job role in teaching at Lubwa.

President Kaunda was then upgraded to a house master and then to a head master at the same school. Between 1947 and 1948, he moved to coper mining area as a mine welfare officer and founded famers’ Cooperative. In 1949, he worked as a Boarding Master at the Mufulira Upper School.

His political career began in the year 1950s where he contributed in founding the African National Congress (ANC) which sought to fight against racial discrimination in Central Africa. He took up the role as a general secretary for five years after it was founded in 1953 under the administration of president Harry Nkumbula.

Later, he separated from President Nkumbula and became the president of Zambia African National Union from 1958 to 1959. His party was then banned over civil war and was incarcerated for nine months. Upon his release, he founded the new United National Independence party in 1960 and took the position of a president.

 

Two years later, he was elected to the Legislative Council. He formed alliance government with Nkumbula’s ANC where he was offered the ministerial role of local government and social welfare.

 

In the process of Zambia’s independence, the country went through series of hitches but became successful with the help of the skilful diplomacy of Kenneth Kaunda over the European and smaller Asian community.

 

Zambia then gained independence in October 1964, Kenneth Kaunda as its president. He served as president for 27 years

Credit: Ghana Education/History/Zambia News/Research/First hand Info

TBT: Inspirational Stories: Meet Kalenga Kamwendo and Besa Mumba, the youngest commercial pilots in Africa. 

Kalenga was just 19 years old when he became Zambia’s youngest pilot. In an exclusive interview African celebs,  Kalenga Kamwendo, the youngest pilot in Africa told us about how it all started and some amazing events that he has coming up.

African celebs: Please introduce yourself?

KK: My name is Kalenga Kamwendo, I’m a 22 year old Zambian youth. I’m a commercial pilot working with Proflight Zambia on the British aerospace jetstream 3200 series.

African celebs: Where are you from and why did you start?

KK: I started because of passion; that should always be the driving force that encourages determination.

I never even knew that being the youngest commercial pilot of a certain country would be something that would be celebrated, but they say you’d be surprised how lucky you get when you work hard.

African celebs: What are your future goals and where do you see yourself in 5 and 10 years time?

KK: So there’s two spheres to where I want to be in the future, there’s the flying ambitions and there’s the non-flying ambitions.

Flying wise I definitely see myself being a captain in 5 years, 10 at the most, God willing of course.

Non flying-wise I wish to have started my own foundation aimed for those who are less privileged in the society and show them that there is a way to success regardless of how high the ladder you have to climb.

kalenga-kamwendo

African celebs: Who inspires you most ?

KK: I draw inspiration from each and every person who wakes up every day with a purpose and drive.

African celebs: What is your motivation?

KK: My motivation is to ensure that when God calls time on my life, that I would have left footprints that will be embedded in the beach and not blown away by the sea.

African celebs: Describe Kalenga in 3 words?

KK: Ground breaking tyrant.

African celebs: Where can we/people find you (social media/website)?

KK: People can get in touch with me on my

Facebook page: Kalenga Kamwendo or www.facebook.com/kalengakamwendopage

Twitter: @kalengakamwendo

Instagram: Kalenga Kamwendo

Snapchat: @lyarist101 (don’t ask)

Such an inspiration, especially to the youth! Well done!

Update: Besa Mumba is now the Zambia’s Youngest Commercial Pilot in Africa

Credit: Kalenga Kamwendo

 

Meet Captain Aluel James Bol of Sudan, In 2011, Captain Aluel James Bol first made history when she became the  first female pilot in Sudan to graduate She also made another history when she became the  first South Sudanese pilot atDelta Airlines.

Photo Credit: Sudan News

 

Meet Captain Amsale Gualu, the first female captain in the history of Ethiopian Airlines in 2010  

 

 

Meet 19 year-old Besa Mumba, Zambia’s Youngest Commercial Pilot. Besa was born on 9th December 1996.  She  began her training with the Charlie 152 and then onto the Charlie 172 plane .

After that she moved on to complex training, the Charlie 172 plane retractable to which she got her caravan rating when I got my commercial pilot license.

Besa then went to get advanced training at semi flight  in South Africa. Upon her return to Zambia, she was offered a job with pro flight Zambia.

 Besa says  ”I’m so happy to be at the proflight my experience has been great so far initially at first I though It would be fancy in the cabin crew but then I thought why not be the one who flight the aircraft. From then onwards I had so many questions like how does it fly, how do they stay in the sky how do they know where they are it made me so curious to be the one behind the controls.

So after I finished high school I went to flight school. There are only a small amount of women who fly aircrafts but women can fly aircrafts so of you are doubting you can do it.when I finish work I like to listen to music.

I also like to rest and relax because it’s very important. I love to see new places and learn new languages. I see myself being a captain on one of the jets because I’m big about flying here in my home country .so far so good it’s been an amazing experience ….’

 

 

Photo credit: Besa Mumba/Proflight Zambia

Prior to Besa becoming the youngest african pilot, Kalenga Kamwendo was held that record aged just 20. We had an exclusive interview the talented Kalenga Kamwendo read all about him here:  Youngest Commercial Pilot In Zambia…aged just 20

Huge  congrats! Such an inspiration to the upcoming youth!

Applications are now open for Africans to engage in SIMP. The program will train African with the requisite skills to help them contribute to positive changes in the world of business in Africa and beyond.

 

Read  Also: Career  & Education 

 

Applicants must be between the ages of 25 and 45 years.

 

Countries eligible for this programme: Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia

 

Application Deadline: The end date for the application is February 20, 2020.

 

Click on the link below to access the official website! https://si.se/en/apply/leadership-programmes

 

Source: Swedish Institute

 

Tech News Of The Month:

Inspirational Stories: Meet Besa Mumba

Zambia’s Youngest Commercial Pilot. Besa was born on 9th December 1996.  She  began her training with the Charlie 152 and then onto the Charlie 172 plane.

After that she moved on to complex training, the Charlie 172 plane retractable to which she got her caravan rating when I got my commercial pilot license.

besa-mumbajpg

Besa then went to get advanced training at semi flight  in South Africa. Upon her return to Zambia, she was offered a job with pro flight Zambia.

 Besa says  ”I’m so happy to be at the proflight my experience has been great so far initially at first I though It would be fancy in the cabin crew but then I thought why not be the one who flight the aircraft.

From then onwards I had so many questions like how does it fly, how do they stay in the sky how do they know where they are it made me so curious to be the one behind the controls.

So after I finished high school I went to flight school.

There are only a small amount of women who fly aircrafts but women can fly aircrafts so of you are doubting you can do it.when I finish work I like to listen to music.

I also like to rest and relax because it’s very important. I love to see new places and learn new languages.

I see myself being a captain on one of the jets because I’m big about flying here in my home country .so far so good it’s been an amazing experience ….’

 

besa

Photo credit: Besa Mumba/Proflight Zambia

Prior to Besa becoming the youngest african pilot, Kalenga Kamwendo was held that record aged just 20. We had an exclusive interview the talented Kalenga Kamwendo read all about him here:  Youngest Commercial Pilot In Zambia…aged just 20

Huge  congrats! Such an inspiration to the upcoming youth!

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First Africans On Earth

TBT: Sonqua, Bushmen, Saake… They have been called by various names by many African tribes and European settlers, who had difficulties in identifying them and their culture. Having inhabited Southern Africa for more than 20 000 years, the San people are the oldest residents of Southern Africa.

Their territory was not only limited to South Africa but it also expanded into Botswana, Namibia, Angola, Zambia, Zimbabwe and Lesotho. Although the groups living in these areas had differences, they were connected by a shared history and linguistic.

HOW IT ALL STARTED

The early signs of San tribes were found to date back to Early Stone Age. There were many clans scattered along Southern Africa who lived a migratory lifestyle, making caves their temporary homes as they go along. Before they started domesticating animals, they were very skilled at tracking and hunting. Another skill they developed over time was to investigate and make us of the flora around them for medicinal purposes.

san

 

INTERACTIONS WITH OTHER TRIBES

As migrations started to occur in other regions of Africa, the San people subsequently started interacting with them. One of them was Khoikhoi that often gets mixed up with the San People. Unlike the San People, Khoikhoi were able to domesticate animals and live closer to a farming-lifestyle in today’s Western Cape.

On the other hand, people of Bantu heritage were also migrating from Central and Western Africa towards the south.

They were also much more settled, living in small villages and planting crops. By the 16th and the 17th centuries, the southern half of Africa was populated by three groups: San, Khoikhoi and Bantu.

sans people

 

WHEN EUROPEAN SETTLERS ARRIVED

The struggles for San People had already started when they had to share the space with settled communities, especially Bantu groups. Thus, small battles ensued between the two, which did not end in the favor of the San who were disadvantages in terms of numbers and weapons.

Things got much worse with the arrival of European settlers, since they were not able to roam freely and migrate as they liked. Those who were caught or defeated after a battle were forced into slavery. The animals they used to hunt for food were hunted or domesticated by farmers, so they no longer had sufficient access to them.

The tribes who refused to join any of the settlements as slaves were put through mass destruction. Overall, they were greatly reduced in numbers, while the remaining people assimilated in the communities that they were placed in.

san
 

SOCIAL LIFE

Although San People had no formal authority figures, they would grant leadership to people with experience and respect within the group through voting.

Instead of a great leader with absolute power, there would be guides or pioneers in every field from hunting to healing. Decisions would be made after council meetings and debates. The economy was based on gifting or trading goods and services.

Given the scarcity of the resources, they were not picky with the food. Among the animals they hunted down were antelopes, zebras, lions, fishes and insects.

They would either roast the meat on fire or place it in boiled water. For water, they were usually collecting rain water using empty ostrich egg shells, digging holes into the ground to search for water or squeezing plant roots to extract moisture.

The most common method for hunting was with bone and arrows. They would poison the tip of the arrow to make the death quicker; however, the poison would not contaminate the meat.

They were also good at setting up various traps such as pitfalls with spikes planted underneath. In terms of distribution, it was usually the man whose arrow shot the animal that decided on the distribution of the meat.

On the other hand, women were occupied with gathering plants that they cooked for their immediate families. Despite the segregation of labor in social life, hunting and plant-gathering were unisex activities. Women were able to participate in hunting and men were able to help women with gathering plants.

In fact, the women were treated with respect and a sense of equality to the extent that they would be able to make decisions on behalf of their families, own water holes and foraging areas.

 
san people

 

BELIEF SYSTEM

The San beliefs differed from one clan to the other. While some clans believed in a single and powerful entity, other worshipped nature, the Sun and the moon. After-life was also an important concept which they believed in, so they always paid homage to their deceased loved ones.

There were four main types of rituals: a boy’s first kill, a girl’s first period, marriage and trance experience. When a boy killed an eland or an antelope, he would be considered transitioning into an adult.

Another interesting ritual was during a girl’s puberty where the women of the tribe would perform a dance that imitated the mating of Eland cows.

Ritual dances and shamanic experiences were of great importance as they were used to practice medicine and observe the effects of herbal medication.

The herb extracts would often be hallucinogenic, putting the people into a dream-like state of mind. Then, they would draw the images appearing before their eyes on cave walls.

The red paint was usually made of animal fat, milk and blood while manganese oxide and charcoal was used for black and white.

 

TODAY’S WORLD AND THE SAN PEOPLE

The controversy around the San People still continues to this day, particularly in Botswana. In the 70s, government took a substantial amount of land from San People and reallocated them to pastoral farmers, especially the farmers of Tswana descent.

In addition, many San tribes were evicted from Kalahari Game Reserves and forced to relocate. South Africa has also lots of conflicts regarding the San.

Because they were given no land-rights, they are mainly living in rural areas and in extreme poverty, being driven into alcoholism, prostitution and crime.

Despite the never-ending struggle, there are also attempts to preserve and resurrect what is left of the San Culture. The rock art and paintings inside hundreds of caves have been taken under protection, while many organizations initiated education centers and museums about the San Heritage.

 

Recommended Stories: Travel Africa

 

Visiting Africa soon? Why not visit South African-Namibian border and learn more about the Oldest Population of Humans On Earth…

Credit: Research/ Ghanaeducation/Southafrica/Education/wiki/Passdownhistory

 

Botswana Set To Join The Kavango-Zambezi (KAZA) Uni-Visa System With Zimbabwe and Zambia. 

This  will facilitate the movement of tourists between the country as well as other Kaza members, Zimbabwe and Zambia.

Tourism Update reports Botswana and Zimbabwe held discussions around the visa inclusion to promote during the Bi-National Commission meeting held in Harare last week. 

The visa came into existence in 2014 and was meant to run as six-month pilot. It currently only exists between Zimbabwe and Zambia, is valid for 30-days and allows holders to do a day-trip to Chobe National Park in Botswana.

Phase 2 will see the visa extended to Angola, Namibia, now with Botswana’s eager to join the Kavango-Zambezi (KAZA) Uni-Visa System, tourism will increase and improve immensely.

The visa which cost $50, and is valid for nationals of 65 countries….

 

Source Zambia News

 

 

 Nollywood Actress, Filmmaker & Entrepreneur Stephanie Linus Hopes the movie ‘DRY’ will be shown in all 54 African countries…

Dry is an inspiring movie based on a true story about Zara and Halima who find themselves in the same cultural trap regardless of their backgrounds. They each struggle to make meaning to their lives. Read full story here

Watch out for DRY movie, coming soon to a theatre near you in Africa…

DRY MOVIE: Stephanie Linus Hopes Her Film 'DRY' Will Inspire The Whole Of Africa

More about Stephanie Linus 

 

Stephanie Linus At The Screening Of Her Movie DRY In Gambia

In Case You Missed It! Nollywood film director, actress and model Stephanie Linus and her team were recently hosted in Gambia by the UNFPA and the Vice President Dr Isatou Njie Saidy to a screening of  the award winning movie ‘DRY’.

DRY Screening in Gambia0Photos- Stephanie Linus At The Screening Of Her Movie DRY In Gambia ..

DRY Screening in Gambia0Photos- Stephanie Linus At The Screening Of Her Movie DRY In Gambia

Stephanie Linus’ award winning movie, DRY, recently made a debut in Gambia with a well-attended screening during the African Youth Summit Banjul Plus 10. The movie was not only well received and greeted with a standing ovation afterwards, but was lauded by all and further opened up the conversation around maternal health care and Fistula in Africa.

The audience was made up of distinguished personalities including the Vice President of Gambia, Dr Isatou Njie Saidy; UNFPA Regional Director for West & Central Africa, Mr Mabingue Ngom; Assistant Minister for Youth Liberia, Ms. Kula Fonfana and many others.

DRY Screening in Gambia004[5] DRY Screening in Gambia019[28] DRY Screening in Gambia037[24]The summit was organised in collaboration with the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) to capture the creative, innovative and pro-active voices of African youth and utilise these voices as a tool to encourage decision makers to address the myriad issues young people on the continent face. It focused on discussions around reinforcing implementation of the policy frameworks in Africa and their pivotal role in harnessing the youth potentials to attain the Demographic Dividend and Africa’s inclusive growth and sustainable development.

DRY Screening in Gambia035[14] Stephanie Linus At The Screening Of Her Movie DRY In Gambia

Inspired by the true story of a young girl living with Vesico Vaginal Fistula, DRY features Darwin Shaw as Dr. Alex, the legendary Liz Benson Ameye as the Matron and Bill McNamara as Dr. Brown. The movie also stars Zubaida Ibrahim as Halima, the teenager who had to endure a life not designed for a child: to be married to a man who was more than four times her age….

DRY Screening in Gambia020[1]This screening comes just a few weeks after Stephanie Linus premiered DRY in Zambia at an event which was attended by the Zambian First Lady, Mrs Esther Lungu. DRY is currently on an African tour and will be showing in other countries in the coming weeks…

Stephanie Linus At The Screening Of Her Movie DRY In Gambia

 

More about Stephanie Linus 

Credit Stephanie Linus 

”Slavery is theft – theft of a life, theft of work, theft of any property or produce, theft even of the children a slave might have borne” ~ Kevin Bales

“Whenever I hear anyone arguing for slavery, I feel a strong impulse to see it tried on him personally.” ~ Abraham Lincoln

Slave Trade In Libya 2017: Migrant Slave Markets In Libya..

It is hard to believe that Slave Trade still in 2017!  Migrant are being sold in a Slave Markets In Libya, North Africa. Many migrants from Cameroon, Senegal, Gambia, Zambia, Sudan, Ghana and Nigeria have been using using Libya as their gateway to Europe.

With the help of greedy human traffickers the migrants travel illegally through the desert all in an attempt to reach Italy, France, UK via Libya.

According to Nikki Laoye an ambassador for NCFRMI, most of the migrants are

”…thrown into jail for illegal entry or falling into the hands of wrong people and being sold into slavery/prostitution…
A total of 3,480 young Nigerians, mostly girls, were returned from Libya in the last 10 months, the National Commission for Refugees, Migrants and Internally Displaced Persons (NCRMI) has confirmed.

The NCRMI South-West Zonal Director, Mrs Magret Ukegbu confirms, that the returnees were received from Feb. 1 to Nov. 6.

Ukegbu said that the commission had been working with the International Organisation for Migration (IOM), National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) and other relevant organisations in receiving the returnees.  Nikki Laoye

 Racism At Its Peak! 2017, yet Race Discrimination SEEMS TO BE AT ITS PEAK. Is a shame one can be discriminated against because they  belong to a certain racial group…All we can say LORD HAVE MERCY!

We’re praying for their safe return back to their countries of origin.

Check out the latest movies on AfroLandTV

Nicholas Munene: Mutuma is a Kenyan actor, model and television host. He has been acting professionally since 2008. He and Chiagoziem Nwakanma star in the hit series ‘This is it’. Set in Lagos, Nigeria, This Is It follows the exciting, hilarious, dramatic and romantic first year journey of the young, clueless Newlyweds, Tomide and Dede! Watch the full season free on AfroLandTV here. Sign up is free. https://www.afrolandtv.com/this-is-it/episode-1-7/    Instagram: @Nickmutuma

Hollywood actress Hope Olaide Wilson is an actress and producer, known for The Last Ship (2014), I Can Do Bad All by Myself (2009) and The Fosters (2013). She stars in this fictional AfroLandTV film  Twitter/Instagram: @HopeOlaide

Jessie Chisi is an award-winning film director from Zambia. Her recent 3-time award winning film ‘Imagination’ is only showing on AfroLandTV. Imagination is a short film and a modest production, which focuses on life and growing up in a peri-urban area of Lusaka, the capital of Zambia. It tells the story of how children in a typical community imagine themselves on a film set. It is the story of Ken, an eight-year-old boy, who dreams of directing his own movie with a film crew made up of his closest friends. Ken and his small band of cohorts set out on an epic journey to tell a tale of good versus evil with the help of their innocent, imaginative minds. Rent her film for only $1.99 with the proceedings going to the children from Zambia who made this film become reality. Watch it here sign

https://www.afrolandtv.com/films/premium/imagination/

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